Touch It To Believe It - Types Of Fabrics For A Stylish Home!

Fabrics are one of the most underrated elements when it comes to designing a trendy and comfortable home. Fabrics have a lot of potential to revamp the image of your home. Using fabrics is also a relatively low cost and easier method to add the ‘glam’ factor to your home!

What Fabrics Can You Use To Dress Up Your Home?

There are numerous fabrics out there which vary in terms of textures, colours, prints, size, style, thickness and ease of maintenance. Due to the seemingly endless number of possibilities, you can be certain that there exists a piece of fabric out there which fits in perfectly into your home, adding the right amount of zest. Here are some of the fabrics you can choose from.... 

In a rush? You can also check the visual summary at the end... But we highly recommend giving this a quick read... !

1. Polyester

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Polyester is a type of fabric that has varied uses. It does not wrinkle easily and is easy to wash and maintain. It is poreless and therefore has a smooth finish.

This makes it a good canvas for prints and colour patterns.

Thus, polyester is an excellent option to consider if you are looking for something to adorn your furniture (such as a tablecloth) or to beautify decorative items by being a solid base for your curios to rest on. Polyester is usually blended with other fabrics to combine the advantages of more fabrics.

2. Leather

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While leather is not a fabric in the pure sense of the word, it is a popular material and often generalised as a commonly used ‘fabric’ for furniture.

Leather creates a majestic impression.

It is formal and the material by itself brings an element of splendour. These features make it a viable fabric for sofas and office rooms. Leather is usually monotonic in colour. Therefore, it is an excellent fit in areas that have patterned flooring or wallpaper. It is also easy to maintain by following a simple cleaning routine on a regular basis.

3. Silk

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In many cultures, silk has been associated with grandeur and richness since the age of kings and queens. The tradition still continues as silk is perceived as an elegant and fancy fabric.

You can use this cloth in the living space of your home to add a dash of royalty.

The unique aspect of silk is that it can be used as an independent style statement such as a wall hanging or if it has a specific print, it can even be displayed in place of a painting. It is not necessary to team up silk with a piece of furniture. Silk sashes can be tied around decorative urns or curtains to add a classy touch.

4. Cotton

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Cotton is a material that ranks very highly on the utilitarian comfort.

Cotton fabric can handle bold colours and prints.

So if you want to experiment with patterns and designs, this is an excellent option to do so. It is natural and sturdy, which makes it an excellent option to consider for bedsheets and relaxing areas. If you live with children or aged people, cotton is a must-have in your home since it can provide a lot of comfort to them.

5. Rayon

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Rayon is quite similar to silk in terms of the feel of the fabric.

The base for manufacturing this material is wood pulp, which makes it close to a natural fabric.

Rayon is quite diverse in terms of texture and different pieces of rayon cloth can feel like silk, cotton, wool and linen. The most common type of rayon that is available is the one that imitates silk. It is even referred to as ‘artificial silk’ sometimes.

Due to its nature, rayon makes an excellent and relatively cheaper substitute for silk. This means that you need not spend a lot on a piece of cloth that adorns your walls or embellishes your furniture, and still enjoy the benefits of having a rich feel.

The maintenance of rayon has to be given special attention to because it is a relatively weak fabric and can stretch or shrink if it is not treated properly. Dry cleaning is advocated.

6. Olefin

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Olefin is also an artificially manufactured material. It is a lot tougher and sturdier than most other fabrics. This feature increases its utilitarian value, making it an ideal fabric for a wide range of purposes in and around the house.

The most common use for olefin as far as household articles go is mats and rugs.

Olefin is more water resistant than many other fabrics. Monotonic colours or simple print patterns are the most common schemes available since the focus of this fabric is more on the utility value. Olefin can be used underneath potted plants, in semi-outdoor spaces and pathways inside the home. Not only does this give a sturdy look and adds depth to your home but it also protects the flooring from scratching and normal wear and tear.

7. Linen

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Linen is in right now. Linen is a commonly used fabric, thanks to its durability and versatility.

Linen, a natural fabric, can be used for gorgeous window treatments.

It can be quite heavy so it will hang well, and it can be ever-so-slightly translucent, too.

For upholstery, it always has been, and always will be, an excellent choice. Its durability is huge, of course, because you want your furniture to stand up to years of wear and tear. It is breathable and soft enough to make a real positive impact on the comfort side as well.

Additionally, the texture of linen changes depending on its weave. So you can use the very coarse look for a natural and relaxed decor. Or, you can have a tight weave with a vibrant dye to make a polished high-end look.

While linen is normally used in neutral shades, you can get as wild or tame with your other pieces and accents as you like. And, neutrals make it incredibly easy to change things up.

8. Nylon

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Nylon fabric is extremely versatile in terms of its durability. Apart from garments, you can see nylon in various everyday items such as ropes and umbrellas. This toughness is because it is artificially synthesised, just like its cousin, polyester fabric.

The strength of the material makes it an excellent option to consider for home decor items.

From curtains to upholstery to cloths for your furniture, nylon is an excellent option to consider.

The sturdiness of the material makes it one of the few reliable fabric options for carpets, rugs and the like too. However, one has to choose an item with adequate thickness for such type of decorative items. Nylon requires moderate care and is reasonably easy to maintain.

To help you decide a suitable fabric to welcome into your home, here are a few factors to consider while selecting one:

  • Usage - Is it to cover a piece of furniture or is it an independent item like drapes?

  • Maintenance - Is it easily tearable? Easy to wash and dry? Can you manage the upkeep?

  • Frequency of use - Is the fabric for use on occasions or a daily basis?

  • Nature of use - If you have children or pets, will the fabric withstand rough usage?

9. Acrylic

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Although not a fabric in the pure sense, a material that seems to be gaining some popularity in modern designs is Acrylic! Acrylic is another category of man-made fibres.

Unlike many artificial fibres, acrylic is quite soft. Not to be confused with the hard plastic like sheets - also made from this material... 

It is therefore used as a replacement for wool. Due to the unique characteristic of blending softness of texture and durability, acrylic is a preferred material for home decor.

Another advantage is that acrylic is good for retaining colour. So it is an excellent canvas for experimenting with various colour schemes, patterns, pictures and prints. Since acrylic is relatively resistant to stains and wrinkles, it is easy to use in and around the house.

Fabrics are truly a gift since it involves less investment and can be modified without much hassle. To find the type of fabric the complements your home decor perfectly, contact Hipcouch today.

Here's a visual guide on the best fabrics you can choose from, for a 'glam' home!

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